First In First Aid

 

WELCOME TO THE AUGUST EDITION OF FIRST IN FIRST AID!


Time flies when you are having fun. That is the only way we can explain how summer is zipping by so quickly! There are only seven weeks left to soak up the sun, and we urge you to make the most of them before you need to grab a sweater from the closet. Need your daily dose of cardio? Try rounding up friends for a quick basketball game instead of sweating over a treadmill. Time for a lunch break? Dig in outdoors to enjoy the sunshine. Is a long weekend approaching? Check out local events and firework shows, or organize your own! Whenever a moment to enjoy the warm weather arises, seize it with open arms. After all, summer does not last long in Canada.

 No matter how you choose to spend the dog days, be smart about your choices. Your health should always be your number one priority. How will you prepare for the weeks ahead? As always, you can count on St. John Ambulance as your go-to source for first aid and safety education. This edition of First in First Aid is packed with all the tips and tricks you need to spend the final days of summer safely. What are you waiting for? Start reading before the last moments of summer pass you by!

 Also, be sure to follow St. John Ambulance Ontario on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to stay up to date on first aid news and tips throughout the month!
 
August Introduction 
 
In This Issue:

Keep Your Head in the Game – Summer Sports Safety: Whether you spend your summer on the field, the court or the diamond, one thing is for sure – you give it your all. Winning might not be everything, but it is still what you strive for. Still, there is a fine line between a good athlete and a foolish one. You should always prioritize your safety above your ambition, or else you might end up in an ambulance instead of on a podium. With so many risks – think concussions, pulled muscles and dehydration – how will you and your team protect yourselves? Be confident in your safety no matter which sport piques your interest with these tips from St. John Ambulance. READ MORE

Snap, Crackle and Pop – Firework Safety: Fireworks are a quintessential part of any summer holiday. As long as rainclouds stay away, anyone can enjoy the bursts of colour that light up the night sky. On some statutory holidays, Ontarians can light their own fireworks, provided that their municipality allows it. You should, however, exercise caution and handle them with care. They are explosives, after all! If you plan on orchestrating your own backyard cavalcade of lights this Civic holiday, prioritize safety to protect yourself – and your neighbours, of course! READ MORE

National Dog Day: On August 26th, dog-lovers around the world will celebrate their four-legged friends. We are doing the same this National Dog Day, by showing our Therapy Dogs some love! Each of our 2,000 volunteer handlers and therapy dogs makes a huge impact in our communities. That is why we are celebrating National Dog Day by highlighting some of the most impactful ways our Therapy Dog teams have comforted and calmed Ontarians. After all, what better time to celebrate man’s best friend than during the dog days of summer? READ MORE

When Food Bites Back – Food Poisoning Prevention: What makes a home-cooked meal different than a burger from a fast-food joint? Perhaps the secret ingredient is the extra elbow grease that goes into kneading your own pizza dough or the unique flare you add with your signature blend of spices. Whatever it is, anyone can agree – the best meal is the one you cook yourself! The perks of playing chef extend beyond the superior flavour of your own cuisine. When you cook at home, you know exactly how your food has been handled. You control the risks in your kitchen with every decision you make, from selecting ingredients to plating the final products. Employ these do’s and don’ts of food safety, and preparing a delicious meal this summer will be easy as pie. READ MORE

Barbecue Safety: When you think about summer, what is the first scent that comes to mind? For many, it is the aroma of meat sizzling on the grill. Barbecuing is a quick and convenient cooking method for long summer nights when the sun stays in the sky long past seven o’clock. The versatile appliance lends a smoky, delicious flavour to anything that you throw in it, from vegetables to garlic bread and anything in between! However, your efforts can literally go up in flames if you do not practice fire safety. Stay safe this summer with these tips to protect both you and your burgers from third-degree burns. READ MORE

The Magna Hoedown: There’s no need to book a flight down to the U.S.A. to enjoy Southern culture. On September 13th and 14th, the Magna Hoedown is returning to York Region for another weekend of foot-stomping fun. We encourage you to partake in the fun and support our activity in Ontario communities, along with nineteen other local charities. Learn more about the event today, and browse our ticket options here. We can’t want to see you there! READ MORE
 
KEEP YOUR HEAD IN THE GAME - SUMMER SPORTS SAFETY


Whether you spend your summer on the field, the court or the diamond, one thing is for sure – you give it your all. Winning might not be everything, but it is still what you strive for. Still, there is a fine line between a good athlete and a foolish one. You should always prioritize your safety above your ambition, or else you might end up in an ambulance instead of on a podium. With so many risks – think concussions, pulled muscles and dehydration – how will you and your team protect yourselves? Be confident in your safety no matter which sport peaks your interest with these tips from St. John Ambulance.
 
Summer Sports 
 
 What’s In Your Sports Bag?

 Injury prevention begins with preparation. Toting a smartly packed duffel bag to your game is your best defence against sports-related injury.
   •A reusable water bottle: You can sweat out three to four pounds of liquid per hour in extreme heat, and even more when you are engaging in vigorous physical activity. Pack a reusable water bottle to quench your thirst on-the-go. Take a swig whenever you can, like during a time out or a break in the game.
•Sports drinks: You lose electrolytes when you sweat, making it harder for your body to retain water. Sports drinks replenish your stores of the essential minerals, so you can get the most out of every drop you drink. Always read the nutritional label before making your choice, and opt for a beverage with low sugar content.
•Snacks: You cannot perform your best when you are running on empty. If you will be on the field for a long time, consider packing handheld, portable snacks to munch on when hunger strikes. Popular choices are granola bars and protein shakes.
•Protective athletic equipment: From ankle braces to helmets, every sport has some form of required gear for injury prevention. Invest in good quality equipment for peace of mind. Not sure what you need? Scroll down to read our guide for choosing the correct sports gear.
•Required medication: If you suffer from an easily-triggered medical condition, pack the appropriate medicine or treatment in your duffel bag. For instance, tote your inhaler along if you have asthma. Unsure if you should avoid the sun with your medication? Read the label or speak to your pharmacist. For those with a serious food allergy, pack an EpiPen in your bag.
•First aid kit: Cuts, scrapes and bruises are no match for a well-packed first aid kit. Our Sports Kit and Enhanced Sports Kit are perfect for the job, offering security and peace of mind wherever you choose to play.

Choosing the Right Gear

 Not all sports safety equipment offers the same protection when you are playing high-impact sports. Use these tips when purchasing gear for you and your family, and enjoy peace of mind during the game.
   •Pick the right gear for the sport. High-impact or high-contact sports will require more equipment than others. Research the recommended guards and pads for your sport of choice before making a trip to your local athletic store.
•Look for a good fit. All sports equipment should fit as intended for optimal protection. Wearing a size too small or too large may even increase your chance of injury, so searching for the right size is important for your safety. If you or your child are still growing, regularly reassess your equipment for fit and comfort – if you outgrow yours, invest in new gear! The cost of a trip to the emergency room far exceeds what you should pay for a helmet or knee pads.
•Replace damaged equipment. Cracked or scratched gear may not perform to its best ability. If your athletic equipment has taken a beating, consider replacing it. It’s a great idea to also keep the instructions that come with the gear, which may tell you when to replace it.
•Regularly clean your gear. You sweat a lot in those helmets and braces, so it is no surprise that they are hot spots for germs. They deserve a deep clean just as much as your jerseys! Hand wash them if they are delicate, and leave them out to dry completely before storing them away.
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Summer Sports 2 
 
 
 Concussions

 Though you can minimize it with preventative safety measures, there is always a chance of injury when you are playing a sport. In particular, players of high-impact sports are prone to suffering head injuries. Concussions are amongst the most common kinds of unintentional injury in Canada, and about half of them result from recreational activity. Only a doctor can accurately diagnose and provide treatment for a concussion, but it is up to you to recognize the signs first. Unfortunately, only half of Canadians know the signs of a serious brain injury. You can help change that – learn how to recognize a concussion below!

 Symptoms: Immediately following a head injury or trauma, be on the lookout for these signs:
   •Headache or discomfort in the head
•Loss of consciousness
•Confusion and amnesia
•Dizziness, nausea and vomiting
•Ringing in the ears
•Slurred speech
•Delayed response to external stimuli
•Fatigue

Some concussion symptoms may not appear for several hours or days following the injury. Keep your eyes peeled for these common signs that appear long after the initial head trauma:
   •Trouble concentrating
•Memory loss
•Irritability
•Personality changes
•Light and noise sensitivity
•Poor sleeping habits
•Depression
•Sensory disorders

If you suspect a concussion, visit your doctor as soon as possible. If he or she confirms a concussion, your physician may prescribe you with pain relievers to alleviate discomfort. More importantly, the ultimate prescription for a concussion is rest! When you injure a muscle, resting promotes quick and effective recovery. Since concussions affect the brain, you should avoid mentally taxing activities, and take time off work or school if advised by your doctor. Refrain from straining your eyes too – reading, texting and watching television are discouraged following a concussion.

 Clearly, it is important to avoid intense physical activity following a concussion. Resuming sports too soon can deteriorate your brain health and cause further injury. That’s why after every head injury, you should always assess the casualty for signs of a concussion before allowing the player to continue playing. 
 
 
SNAP, CRACKLE AND POP - FIREWORK SAFETY


Fireworks are a quintessential part of any summer holiday. As long as rainclouds stay away, anyone can enjoy the bursts of colour that light up the night sky. On some statutory holidays, Ontarians can light their own fireworks, provided that their municipality allows it. You should, however, exercise caution and handle them with care. They are explosives, after all! If you plan on orchestrating your own backyard cavalcade of lights this Civic holiday, prioritize safety to protect yourself – and your neighbours, of course!
 
 
Firework Safety 
 
 
Where and when can I organize a fireworks show?

 Your municipality establishes and enforces the law surrounding firework displays in your neighbourhood. Most areas only allow civilians to create their own firework displays on certain days of the year, and forbid firework use on public property to avoid disturbing others. You can check your local by-laws for the rules in your area. Want to coordinate a display on a different date than those allowed by your region? You may be able to apply for a permit to light your own firecrackers on your property.

Where should I store fireworks?

 Though deemed safe for public use, consumer fireworks are still explosives that should be handled with care. Federal law prohibits the storage of over 10 kilograms of fireworks within a residential building or adjoining structure. If your fireworks weigh less than this limit, store your explosives in a cool, dry place far from heat sources and flammable material. They should also be kept away from children under the age of 18.

How should I safely set up fireworks displays on my property?

 Thoroughly read the instruction manual that comes with your fireworks before you begin, fully understanding any warnings. Then, evaluate the weather. Consider rescheduling your fireworks show if the forecast calls for rain or heavy winds. If conditions are favourable, you may choose a spot to set up your fireworks! Pick a flat plot of land – it will be easier to stand your firecrackers up, and will thus reduce your chances of misfiring. Also, make sure that your location of choice is a clear, open space in case your explosives wind up going awry.

Who should and should not be detonating fireworks?

 Explosives are dangerous, so everyone in the near vicinity of a firework should be responsible and sober – including you! Don’t light fireworks while under the influence, and make sure everyone helping you is sober too. Keep children away from the site of the explosives if they are under the age of 18.

How can I exercise fire safety while detonating my fireworks?

 Fire is the biggest concern during a firework show, so be extra cautious while managing your display. Keep hair and loose fabric away from fire sources, and wear protective equipment like goggles and gloves while you tend to your fireworks. With the exception of sparklers, you should never light a firework in your hand. Mount them on a flat surface instead, and light them one at a time for full control over the explosives.

I lit one of my fireworks, but it did not detonate. Can I try to relight it?

 A failed firecracker is referred to as a “dud”, and you should not attempt to relight it. If the product is defective, trying to light it a second time could cause a misfire and injure people in its vicinity.

How do I safely clean up after using sparklers and fireworks?

 As soon as sparklers burn out, bury them with sand. Once all the remnants of your light show have cooled down, you may collect them and dispose of them accordingly. Consult your municipality to find out how you should dispose of your used sparklers and fireworks.

 Now that you know a little more about firework safety, you are all set to orchestrate your own backyard light show this Civic holiday. Still not sure whether you are up to it? No worries. Keep one of our Family First Aid Kits close at hand for added peace of mind.
 
 
NATIONAL DOG DAY


On August 26th, dog-lovers around the world will celebrate their four-legged friends. We are doing the same this National Dog Day, by showing our Therapy Dogs some love! Each of our 2,000 volunteer handlers and therapy dogs makes a huge impact in our communities. That is why we are celebrating National Dog Day by highlighting some of the most impactful ways our Therapy Dog teams have comforted and calmed Ontarians. After all, what better time to celebrate man’s best friend than during the dog days of summer?

Our Therapy Dogs: By The Numbers

 Sometimes, you need a helping hand or a listening ear to help you back on your feet. A companion to see you through stressful days and dark nights. A friend who will not judge you for your troubles, and who will give you his undivided attention. That is where our therapy dogs come in, providing Ontarians with mental health relief and much-needed companionship when they need it most. Our Therapy Dog Teams visit hospitals, schools and even airports to lift spirits wherever they go!
 
Therapy Dog Information 
 

Community Highlights

Comforting Ontarians After the Yonge Street Van Attack: The Yonge Street van attack in April of 2018 devastated Torontonians last spring, leaving 10 dead and 16 injured. Many bystanders were left anxious and stressed after the horrific events. Our St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog teams provided comfort and relief for affected Torontonians at Mel Lastman Square following the incident. The dogs did a great job, helping those affected by the tragedy feel safe and discuss their feelings after the tragedy.

Dog Day of Winter: Many Canadians experience some form of seasonal affective disorder – a condition that triggers symptoms of depression during the winter months due to the lack of sunshine. To battle the winter blues, CBC and St. John Ambulance teamed up to organize a public therapy dog session outside of the CBC London studio. The event was broadcast live too so that Ontarians could see firsthand the impact of therapy dogs from the comfort of their own homes. Everyone – especially our therapy dogs – enjoyed the relaxing event held during the darkest days of the year!

Rinkside Reassurement: The St. John Ambulance understands that tryouts can be tough, especially on the little ones. While the Halton Hills Minor Hockey Association (HHMHA) picked players for the little league team, our therapy dogs were waiting outside to comfort any kid who needed an extra paw for support. Even parents wound up consulting the pups for some stress relief while waiting for the HHMHA’s decision!

Frequent Flyers: Therapy Dogs at Pearson Airport: Six months ago, fifteen of our very own therapy dogs got the chance to cheer up travellers in Toronto’s Pearson Airport. Passengers can now pet the pups for some much-needed stress relief before going through airport security. The program is particularly helpful for nervous flyers who need to relax before boarding their flights. Today, thirteen of our four-legged friends continue to bring a smile to any vacationers who wander through terminals 1 or 3.

Special Shout Outs

Pablo: Despite losing his leg in an accident when he was only four months old, Pablo does not let his injury stop him from interacting with people who need some TLC. You can find him most often at Billy Bishop Airport, but he also spends time comforting distressed Ontarians who need it most. Pablo diligently comforted people affected by the Danforth shooting and the Yonge Street van attack in 2018. Read more about his efforts in this article from CTV News!

Mia: This pup was born to be a people-pleaser. She began therapy dog training at only 18 months, and regularly visited post-secondary institutions to comfort students who needed some extra support. Mia passed away this month from cancer, but her memory lives on with the students who she comforted throughout her life. Learn more about Mia from this article published by the North Bay Nugget.

Midnight: Midnight was rescued from the streets after her previous owner abandoned her. It was quickly apparent that she had a natural knack for connecting with people, so owner Steve Lewis signed her up as a therapy dog. She lifted spirits wherever she went, even at funeral homes! Midnight passed at the age of 11 late last year, but her legacy lives on. The North Bay Nugget has more information about Midnight’s contributions to St. John Ambulance’s Therapy Dog Program.

Dexter: One of our therapy dogs from North Bay, Dexter was featured on television this year. He visits local universities and loves to cuddle. We could say more, but this segment on CTV does it better – check out the full clip!

Murphy: Meet Murphy – the first Canadian therapy dog to be allowed into an emergency room. He has been visiting Saskatoon’s Royal University Hospital since 2015, calming patients of all ages. Now, Murphy has been immortalized in a story written by his owner called “Murphy Mondays”. The illustrated children’s book chronicles the therapy dog’s activity in the hospital and was published with a grant from the Royal University Hospital in September. Well done Murphy!
 
Become a Therapy Dog Volunteer!

 Think your pup has what it takes to become a therapy dog with St. John Ambulance? Use this checklist to figure out whether your four-legged friend is cut out to volunteer with us!
   •Age: Therapy dogs need to be mature so that their temperament may be managed. To be considered, your dog needs to be at least one year of age. Sometimes, a minimum age of two years is enforced.
•Medical history: Since therapy dogs are in constant contact with the public, they need to be in top condition to avoid spreading disease. Candidates must have their vaccinations up to date.
•Diet: Raw food diets are strictly prohibited for therapy dogs on the grounds of cleanliness and disease prevention.
•Temperament: Therapy dogs need to be calm to avoid intimidating young kids or the elderly. They must not be hyper or respond aggressively to sounds or motion.
•Friendly: Therapy dogs often encounter crowded places and unfamiliar faces. They must not be phased by such a chaotic environment. For example, they must be able to stay still in the midst of milling crowds.
•Obedient: Understanding and obeying commands is a necessity for therapy dogs since their owners need to maintain control of their pets in the case of an unforeseen disturbance. Candidates must complete obedience training and pass a test before being allowed to act as a therapy dog.

Want to learn more? Check out our website and sign your four-legged friend up to become a therapy dog today! 
 


WHEN FOOD BITES BACK: FOOD POISONING PREVENTION


What makes a home-cooked meal different than a burger from a fast-food joint? Perhaps the secret ingredient is the extra elbow grease that goes into kneading your own pizza dough or the unique flare you add with your signature blend of spices. Whatever it is, anyone can agree – the best meal is the one you cook yourself! The perks of playing chef extend beyond the superior flavour of your own cuisine. When you cook at home, you know exactly how your food has been handled. You control the risks in your kitchen with every decision you make, from selecting ingredients to plating the final products. Minimize your risk of a bad stomach with these do’s and don’ts of food safety in the kitchen.

DO wash your produce before using it. You don’t know how clean your fruits and vegetables are when you pick them up from the grocery store. Where did they come from? Who handled them? Rinsing your produce reduces your risk of food poisoning. Plus, some produce like pears and apples are treated with wax to make them look shiny – not ideal for consumption! Washing them helps remove the waxy coating so that you only eat the good stuff.

DON’T thaw frozen food out on the counter. When food is room temperature, it becomes an optimal breeding ground for bacteria and viruses. Instead, place it in the fridge until it is ready to cook. Can’t wait that long? Unwrap it and run it under cool water for a faster thaw. You may also pop frozen food in the microwave for a few seconds, but keep an eye on it – too long and you might start to cook it!

DO store raw meat on the bottom shelf of your refrigerator. Any juice that leaks from it will be contained instead of falling onto food on lower shelves.

DON’T store different raw meats together. Fish, meat and poultry are easily contaminable. Bacteria that thrives on one piece can quickly spread to others. To reduce your risk of cross-contaminating all the protein in your refrigerator, store each type of raw meat in a separate container.

DO cook your fish, poultry and meat thoroughly. These ingredients may be cleaner after washing them, but cooking them at a high enough temperature will kill off any remaining contaminants. Want peace of mind? Invest in a meat thermometer for confidence that you’re cooking your ingredients to the right temperature.

DON’T use the same chopping board for all your food. Avoid cross-contamination by using one for raw meat, one for cooked meat, and one for produce. Consider using plastic boards instead of wooden ones for meat, as you will be able to clean them more thoroughly.

DO wash your hands before you touch your food. Your food might be clean, but your hands aren’t. They pick up bacteria and viruses from every surface you touch, and can deposit them on your food! Washing your hands both while you are preparing your meal and before you chow down will minimize your risk of ingesting contaminants.

DON’T leave food uncovered. If you find your meal tempting, pests will too. If you need to leave it in your backyard unattended, use a mesh cover to keep mosquitoes, flies and birds from scavenging off your plate.

DO refrigerate leftovers as fast as possible. Food should be stored at temperatures below 4°C when it is not being cooked to inhibit bacteria growth. Room temperature is much higher, so you should avoid leaving food out for long periods of time. Only keep food out for an hour or two, and then store the remainder in the refrigerator.

DON’T ignore the expiry date. Beyond the expiry date, there is no guarantee that your food is safe for consumption. Throw out any ingredients that have passed their expiry dates – eating them is not worth a case of food poisoning!

Eating Dinner Out – Who Should You Trust?

 When you are enjoying dinner at a restaurant, you have much less control over what goes into your meal. Though you cannot see exactly how your food is handled in the kitchen, you can reduce your chances of contracting food poisoning with help from your local health authority. All municipalities in Ontario have their own health authority system that inspects restaurants to ensure that they follow proper food safety precautions. In most systems, every restaurant has a certificate indicating its adherence to food safety protocol. You have the right to request to see this certificate – if it indicates that food is being mishandled, you may want to choose another place to dine!

 Not sure how your local food inspection authority operates? Find your region on this list and learn. Some regions have even made it easier for you to find safe restaurants by maintaining a catalogue of approved restaurants online!
 
 
BBQ Safety 
 
BARBECUE SAFETY

When you think about summer, what is the first scent that comes to mind? For many, it is the aroma of meat sizzling on the grill. Barbecuing is a quick and convenient cooking method for long summer nights when the sun stays in the sky long past seven o’clock. The versatile appliance lends a smoky, delicious flavour to anything that you throw in it, from vegetables to garlic bread and anything in between! However, your efforts can literally go up in flames if you do not practice fire safety. Stay safe this summer with these tips to protect both you and your burgers from third-degree burns.

Before turning on the grill…
•Clear the area. Always barbecue in an open space free of flammable materials. Never cook under a canopy or tent, as they can trap carbon monoxide and smoke in the area – not good for you or your burgers!
•Do a maintenance check. Your barbecue may have sustained damage since the last time you used it. Is there rust accumulating on the interior of the hood? Try scrubbing it off to prevent it from contaminating your food. Have raccoons gnawed away at wires? Replace or repair them before operating your grill.
•Check for gas leaks. Light your barbecue when it has a gas leak, and it may go up in flames. Use soapy water to check for leaks – if you see bubbles, you should have your grill serviced before attempting to use it.
•Scrub your burners. Build-ups in your grill can start a fire – remove any gunk before lighting your barbecue. Opt for a plastic scrubbing tool over a wire brush, since the latter can leave metal filaments on your grill.
•Keep a first aid kit close at hand. Choose one that has an assortment of material to treat burns, like our Break Room Kit.


While grilling…
•Light your barbecue safely. ◦Make sure your lid is open to prevent gas from building up in the hood.
◦Tighten the valve on your gas tank.
◦Adjust burner controls to their lowest settings.
◦Lean away from the grill when igniting the grill.
◦If the barbecue does not light, wait a few minutes and try again. If you retry immediately, any buildup of gas may ignite in a ball of flames.

•Never leave the grill unattended. This is especially true if you have pets or children around.
•Use long-handled tools with rubber grips to cook on the grill so that you can keep your distance from the fire.


After use…
•Close the gas valve. Shut it as tightly as you can to prevent leaks.
•Let the remaining gas in the hose burn out.
•Turn off burners. If you do not, they may still be on the next time you light your barbecue.


Remember, if you still wind up with a nasty burn, your goal should be to cool the area as fast as possible. Run it under cool water for 10 minutes at minimum. Call emergency services if the burn is larger than your hand, on the face, hands or feet, or a deep burn. Also, cover the burnt area with an approved burn dressing, if you cannot, use a non-fibrous material, like cling wrap, to protect it from infection.
 
 
 
MAGNA HOEDOWN - SEPTEMBER 13th AND 14th
 
Magna Hoedown 
 
 There’s no need to book a flight down to the U.S.A. to enjoy Southern culture this September. Instead, Magna Corporation – the Canadian-based international car parts manufacturer – is bringing beer, barbecue and all things country to you! On September 13th and 14th, the Magna Hoedown is returning to York Region for another weekend of foot-stomping fun. On Friday, watch finalists for the Hoedown Showdown – an Ontario-wide country music competition – perform while you enjoy southern fare from the Food Trucks & Craft Beer Festival. The following day, the party continues with line dancing and dinner, along with the crowning of the 2019 Hoedown Showdown winner. Plus, acclaimed country artists like Alan Doyle and the James Barker Band will be performing all weekend long!

 Ticket sales contribute directly towards twenty local charities, including St. John Ambulance. There is also the Prospector’s Raffle – All raffle ticket sales proceeds go to the 20 Magna Hoedown recipients. The Prospector’s Raffle has a grand prize of $100,000; second prize $10,000; third prize $5,000. Tickets are 3 for $20 and the winning tickets will be drawn on September 14th. Tickets are available through the St. John Ambulance York Region Branch 905-773-3394. Lottery License #10914.

 We encourage you to partake in the fun and support our activity in Ontario communities. Learn more about the event today, and browse our ticket options here. We can’t wait to see you there!
 
 
THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT!


At St. John Ambulance, we believe that there is always room for improvement when it comes to first aid and safety education. It is why we do our best every day to provide accessible and affordable first aid education and products across the province. Still, we don’t stop there – almost all the proceeds we receive from the sale of first aid products and services go towards our community events and clinics, bringing safety to your doorstep. Of course, none of this would be possible without our amazing host of volunteers and donors who support us every day to make Ontario a safer place for everyone. We are forever grateful for their contributions, no matter how big or how small! Thank you for working so hard to make our neighbourhoods safer, one day at a time.